The most important graph in educational psychology

The most important graph in educational psychology is buried in an appendix of an article, but it explains so much about how individual differences have important consequences in adulthood. The graph comes from an article by Jonathan Wai and his colleagues (2009, p. 834) and is shown below. The graph is based on data from

Teachers say the darndest things (about intelligence)

It’s time for a thought experiment! Imagine what would happen if most people working in engineering did not have a correct understanding of the basic principles of physics. Alternatively, ponder what would happen if a majority of physicians had incorrect ideas about biology and the causes of disease. Of course, the result would be disastrous.

The one variable that makes growth mindset interventions work

Do you believe that how hard you work to learn something is more important than how smart you are? Do you think that intelligence is not set in stone, but that you can make yourself much smarter? If so, congratulations! You have a growth mindset. Proposed by Stanford psychologist Carol S. Dweck, mindset theory states

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