The $67.5 million wasted on stereotype threat research

One popular topic in psychology when discussing test performance is the idea of stereotype threat. First proposed by Claude Steele and Joshua Aronson in 1995, the stereotype threat is phenomenon where a person who belongs to a stereotyped demographic group performs in accordance with the stereotype after being reminded of it. Usually this is suggested

Thoughts on low national IQs, intellectual disability, and data quality

A recent now-retracted paper in Psychological Science by Clark et al. (2020) caused some controversy lately in the psychological community. The authors found some correlations with other national-level data that could be theoretically important. Among the reasons that people criticized the article was the authors’ use of estimated average national IQ scores (Becker, 2019). For

Teachers say the darndest things (about intelligence)

It’s time for a thought experiment! Imagine what would happen if most people working in engineering did not have a correct understanding of the basic principles of physics. Alternatively, ponder what would happen if a majority of physicians had incorrect ideas about biology and the causes of disease. Of course, the result would be disastrous.

Intelligence research: An example of Thomas Kuhn’s “normal science”

Psychology is a mess. And I don’t say that because of the consequences of the replication crisis. No, compared to biology and the physical sciences, psychology is a mess because it has no unifying theory. Biology has evolutionary theory as a powerful framework for understanding everything from ecology to genetics. Chemistry has atomic theory, which

Standardized tests: NOT designed for standardized minds

In response to my list of 35 myths about human intelligence that my upcoming book tackles, I have had people ask me what intelligence myths didn’t make the cut. It is a fun thought experiment to think how the book would be different with a different mix of incorrect ideas to address and correct. [Update:

Lewontin’s bait-and-switch: A strategy to undermine genetic explanations of behavior

Coinciding with the launch of his book, Human Diversity: The Biology of Gender, Race, and Class (see my thoughts here), Charles Murray had an opinion piece in The Wall Street Journal where, among other things, he discussed the importance of polygenic scores in making predictions. Polygenic scores are scores derived from DNA variants. Bits of

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