The lost intelligence tests

Last year, I co-authored an article with my student where we identified the first known publication of the subtests that appear on the Stanford-Binet 5, the WPPSI-IV, WISC-V, and WAIS-IV (Gibbons & Warne, 2019). Much to our suprise, we found that the majority of subtest formats on these popular intelligence tests were created by 1908.

Terman’s non-geniuses: Shockley and Alvarez

Over the years, I’ve become a scholar of Lewis Terman’s Genetic Studies of Genius, which was a study that followed the lives of 1,528 high-IQ children from 1921 to 1999. It’s a landmark study in the history of psychology and was groundbreaking in the fields of methodology, gifted education, intelligence research, and developmental psychology (Warne,

Comparing the 1975 and 1996 APA statements on intelligence

One of the most highly cited articles in intelligence research is a 1996 report commissioned by the American Psychological Association’s Board of Scientific Affairs to provide an authoritative statement on the science of intelligence (Neisser et al., 1996). What many people do not know, though, is that this was not the first time APA’s Board

Discovery of IQ scores for conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton

Archival research can sometimes be very surprising. I experienced this firsthand last week when I doing some research for a manuscript that I am coauthoring with a colleague. I was reading some historical scientific articles when I stumbled upon a book chapter entitled “A Study of a Pair of Siamese Twins” (Koch, 1928). Of course,

Thoughts on low national IQs, intellectual disability, and data quality

A recent now-retracted paper in Psychological Science by Clark et al. (2020) caused some controversy lately in the psychological community. The authors found some correlations with other national-level data that could be theoretically important. Among the reasons that people criticized the article was the authors’ use of estimated average national IQ scores (Becker, 2019). For

Teachers say the darndest things (about intelligence)

It’s time for a thought experiment! Imagine what would happen if most people working in engineering did not have a correct understanding of the basic principles of physics. Alternatively, ponder what would happen if a majority of physicians had incorrect ideas about biology and the causes of disease. Of course, the result would be disastrous.

Standardized tests: NOT designed for standardized minds

In response to my list of 35 myths about human intelligence that my upcoming book tackles, I have had people ask me what intelligence myths didn’t make the cut. It is a fun thought experiment to think how the book would be different with a different mix of incorrect ideas to address and correct. [Update:

35 mitos sobre la inteligencia humana

English version of this post – Versión en inglés de esta entrada En el 30 de noviembre de 2019, mandé el texto final de mi próximo libro In the Know: Debunking 35 Myths About Human Intelligence (con el título en español de Estar al tanto: Desmintiendo 35 mitos sobre la inteligencia humana) a la editorial.

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