35 Myths About Human Intelligence

Earlier today I submitted the final text for my upcoming book In the Know: Debunking 35 Myths About Human Intelligence. It feels good to have it in the hands of my publisher. There is still some work to do, but most of it is work that my publisher has to do–not me. The book has

Combining cut scores for gifted identification: No impact on diversity

I already blogged about an important paper which showed that averaging scores on tests is the most accurate method of identifying children for gifted programs (McBee, Peters, & Waterman, 2014). A paper by my colleague, Joni M. Lakin, built on this earlier research and was named the Paper of the Year in Gifted Child Quarterly

Garett Jones’s HIVE MIND: Lots of buzz, not much sting

I finally found time this month to read Hive Mind: How Your Nation’s IQ Matters So Much More Than Your Own, by Garett Jones. I’ve heard a lot of about the book since it was published in 2016, and I think it is worth readers’ time, though not without major problems. What Hive Mind Gets

Hans Eysenck’s personality epidemiological research: Fishy and fraudulent

The latest scientific scandal is a re-examination of the work of Hans Eysenck, a British psychologist who very prominent in his lifetime. One recent study ranked him as the 13th most eminent psychologist of the 20th century (Haggbloom et al., 2002). A different study ranked him as the 46th most influential psychologist of all time

The jangle fallacy: Aptitude ≈ achievement

After my last post about the jingle fallacy, it is impossible to resist talking about the jangle fallacy. In short, the jangle fallacy occurs when a person treats two concepts as being different because there are different words for them. The jangle fallacy occurs because “. . . psychologists can name more things than they

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