The lost intelligence tests

Last year, I co-authored an article with my student where we identified the first known publication of the subtests that appear on the Stanford-Binet 5, the WPPSI-IV, WISC-V, and WAIS-IV (Gibbons & Warne, 2019). Much to our suprise, we found that the majority of subtest formats on these popular intelligence tests were created by 1908.

Discovery of IQ scores for conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton

Archival research can sometimes be very surprising. I experienced this firsthand last week when I doing some research for a manuscript that I am coauthoring with a colleague. I was reading some historical scientific articles when I stumbled upon a book chapter entitled “A Study of a Pair of Siamese Twins” (Koch, 1928). Of course,

Jolly’s A HISTORY OF AMERICAN GIFTED EDUCATION: An essential resource

The latest book that I’ve finished is A History of American Gifted Education (Jolly, 2018), a lively tome that should be required reading for any graduate student or scholar in the field. Jennifer is a colleague, and we are guest co-editors on a special issue for a journal, and I am one of her associate

Leta Hollingworth was a eugenicist, too

Leta Hollingworth is one of the pioneers of gifted education. She was the first to create a research-based special curriculum for gifted children, and she was much more interested in the social and emotional development of gifted children than anyone else in the field at the time. Although neglected after her death, Hollingworth’s reputation made

Intelligence research: An example of Thomas Kuhn’s “normal science”

Psychology is a mess. And I don’t say that because of the consequences of the replication crisis. No, compared to biology and the physical sciences, psychology is a mess because it has no unifying theory. Biology has evolutionary theory as a powerful framework for understanding everything from ecology to genetics. Chemistry has atomic theory, which

Standardized tests: NOT designed for standardized minds

In response to my list of 35 myths about human intelligence that my upcoming book tackles, I have had people ask me what intelligence myths didn’t make the cut. It is a fun thought experiment to think how the book would be different with a different mix of incorrect ideas to address and correct. [Update:

Zenderland’s biography of Henry Goddard

I just finished reading Leila Zenderland’s (1998) biography of Henry H. Goddard, a pioneering psychologist in intelligence testing. It is the best biography of any of the early psychologists involved with the development of intelligence testing. Henry Herbert Goddard was a psychologist who, in the early 20th century, was America’s foremost expert on the identification

css.php