The “fifty million Frenchmen can’t be wrong” replication fallacy

Last week’s post about the flimsy evidence regarding stereotype threat (and the massive amounts of money wasted chasing stereotype threat effects) was far more popular than I expected. The tweet where I publicized it was my most viewed tweet in over a year, and already it is one my most popular blog posts ever. So,

The $67.5 million wasted on stereotype threat research

One popular topic in psychology when discussing test performance is the idea of stereotype threat. First proposed by Claude Steele and Joshua Aronson in 1995, the stereotype threat is phenomenon where a person who belongs to a stereotyped demographic group performs in accordance with the stereotype after being reminded of it. Usually this is suggested

Discovery of IQ scores for conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton

Archival research can sometimes be very surprising. I experienced this firsthand last week when I doing some research for a manuscript that I am coauthoring with a colleague. I was reading some historical scientific articles when I stumbled upon a book chapter entitled “A Study of a Pair of Siamese Twins” (Koch, 1928). Of course,

So long, farewell to the National Association for Gifted Children

I am allowing my membership in the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) to lapse at the end of Friday, July 31, 2020. This means that I will be leaving the organization. I do this with a heavy heart because NAGC has been my scholarly home for 12 years, and it was the first scholarly

Thoughts on low national IQs, intellectual disability, and data quality

A recent now-retracted paper in Psychological Science by Clark et al. (2020) caused some controversy lately in the psychological community. The authors found some correlations with other national-level data that could be theoretically important. Among the reasons that people criticized the article was the authors’ use of estimated average national IQ scores (Becker, 2019). For

Teachers say the darndest things (about intelligence)

It’s time for a thought experiment! Imagine what would happen if most people working in engineering did not have a correct understanding of the basic principles of physics. Alternatively, ponder what would happen if a majority of physicians had incorrect ideas about biology and the causes of disease. Of course, the result would be disastrous.

Forty years squandered by IQ environmentalists

Update: This post has been translated into French. Cet article a été traduit en français. The latest book that I have finished reading is James Flynn’s (1980) Race, IQ and Jensen. This is the earliest work by Flynn that I have ever read, and I can see in it seeds of his later thought. The

css.php