The lost intelligence tests

Last year, I co-authored an article with my student where we identified the first known publication of the subtests that appear on the Stanford-Binet 5, the WPPSI-IV, WISC-V, and WAIS-IV (Gibbons & Warne, 2019). Much to our suprise, we found that the majority of subtest formats on these popular intelligence tests were created by 1908.

Terman’s non-geniuses: Shockley and Alvarez

Over the years, I’ve become a scholar of Lewis Terman’s Genetic Studies of Genius, which was a study that followed the lives of 1,528 high-IQ children from 1921 to 1999. It’s a landmark study in the history of psychology and was groundbreaking in the fields of methodology, gifted education, intelligence research, and developmental psychology (Warne,

The most important graph in educational psychology

The most important graph in educational psychology is buried in an appendix of an article, but it explains so much about how individual differences have important consequences in adulthood. The graph comes from an article by Jonathan Wai and his colleagues (2009, p. 834) and is shown below. The graph is based on data from

Comparing the 1975 and 1996 APA statements on intelligence

One of the most highly cited articles in intelligence research is a 1996 report commissioned by the American Psychological Association’s Board of Scientific Affairs to provide an authoritative statement on the science of intelligence (Neisser et al., 1996). What many people do not know, though, is that this was not the first time APA’s Board

The “fifty million Frenchmen can’t be wrong” replication fallacy

Last week’s post about the flimsy evidence regarding stereotype threat (and the massive amounts of money wasted chasing stereotype threat effects) was far more popular than I expected. The tweet where I publicized it was my most viewed tweet in over a year, and already it is one my most popular blog posts ever. So,

The $67.5 million wasted on stereotype threat research

One popular topic in psychology when discussing test performance is the idea of stereotype threat. First proposed by Claude Steele and Joshua Aronson in 1995, the stereotype threat is phenomenon where a person who belongs to a stereotyped demographic group performs in accordance with the stereotype after being reminded of it. Usually this is suggested

Discovery of IQ scores for conjoined twins Daisy and Violet Hilton

Archival research can sometimes be very surprising. I experienced this firsthand last week when I doing some research for a manuscript that I am coauthoring with a colleague. I was reading some historical scientific articles when I stumbled upon a book chapter entitled “A Study of a Pair of Siamese Twins” (Koch, 1928). Of course,

So long, farewell to the National Association for Gifted Children

I am allowing my membership in the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) to lapse at the end of Friday, July 31, 2020. This means that I will be leaving the organization. I do this with a heavy heart because NAGC has been my scholarly home for 12 years, and it was the first scholarly

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